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March 5th, 2019 at 11:54:09 AM permalink
AZDuffman
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 128
Posts: 13286
Is This The End of Recycling?

Appears the dirty little secret is we were sending lots of trash to China.

We should be able to burn plastics. Metal is easy to recycle. Glass can be ground down and used as sand on the beach, maybe in roads?
The man who damns money has obtained it dishonorably; the man who respects it has earned it
March 5th, 2019 at 12:03:48 PM permalink
Evenbob
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 138
Posts: 21955
Quote: AZDuffman
Is This The End of Recycling?
Appears the dirty little secret is we were sending lots of trash to China.


I've never understood the horror of
of putting plastic bottles in a landfill.
We take the oil out of the ground,
make plastic out of it, but if we put
it back in the ground when we're
done, that's an offense against god.
If you take a risk, you may lose. If you never take a risk, you will always lose.
March 5th, 2019 at 12:06:39 PM permalink
AZDuffman
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 128
Posts: 13286
Quote: Evenbob

I've never understood the horror of
of putting plastic bottles in a landfill.
We take the oil out of the ground,
make plastic out of it, but if we put
it back in the ground when we're
done, that's an offense against god.


Why not just burn them?

I do know that recycling plastics is very tricky. But there has to be other ways to get rid of it. Grind it up for fill or something.
The man who damns money has obtained it dishonorably; the man who respects it has earned it
March 7th, 2019 at 8:12:27 AM permalink
reno
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 58
Posts: 1332
Quote: AZDuffman
But there has to be other ways to get rid of it. Grind it up for fill or something.


They're using plastic waste in India to build roads:

Quote: The Guardian
Jambulingam Street, Chennai, is a local legend. The tar road in the bustling Nungambakkam area has weathered a major flood, several monsoons, recurring heat waves and a steady stream of cars, trucks and auto rickshaws without showing the usual signs of wear and tear. Built in 2002, it has not developed the mosaic of cracks, potholes or craters that typically make their appearance after it rains. Holding the road together is an unremarkable material: a cheap, polymer glue made from shredded waste plastic.

Jambulingam Street was one of India’s first plastic roads . The environmentally conscious approach to road construction was developed in India around 15 years ago in response to the growing problem of plastic litter. As time wore on, polymer roads proved to be surprisingly durable, winning support among scientists and policymakers in India as well as neighboring countries like Bhutan. “The plastic tar roads have not developed any potholes, rutting, raveling or edge flaw, even though these roads are more than four years of age,” observed an early performance report by India’s Central Pollution Control Board. Today, there are more than 21,000 miles of plastic road in India, and roughly half are in the southern state of Tamil Nadu. Most are rural roads, but a small number have also been built in cities such as Chennai and Mumbai.


United Airlines is already purchasing jet fuel from Fulcrum Bioenergy's Reno Nevada facility which makes the jet fuel from municipal solid waste... ie, household trash. Fulcrum needs a feedstock composed of paper, cardboard, plastic, food, and yard waste. Their facility under construction in Gary, Indiana will take 700,000 tons of Chicago trash and convert it to 33 million gallons of jet fuel annually.
March 7th, 2019 at 8:43:37 AM permalink
kenarman
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 11
Posts: 2190
Quote: reno
They're using plastic waste in India to build roads:

Quote: The Guardian
Jambulingam Street, Chennai, is a local legend. The tar road in the bustling Nungambakkam area has weathered a major flood, several monsoons, recurring heat waves and a steady stream of cars, trucks and auto rickshaws without showing the usual signs of wear and tear. Built in 2002, it has not developed the mosaic of cracks, potholes or craters that typically make their appearance after it rains. Holding the road together is an unremarkable material: a cheap, polymer glue made from shredded waste plastic.

Jambulingam Street was one of India’s first plastic roads . The environmentally conscious approach to road construction was developed in India around 15 years ago in response to the growing problem of plastic litter. As time wore on, polymer roads proved to be surprisingly durable, winning support among scientists and policymakers in India as well as neighboring countries like Bhutan. “The plastic tar roads have not developed any potholes, rutting, raveling or edge flaw, even though these roads are more than four years of age,” observed an early performance report by India’s Central Pollution Control Board. Today, there are more than 21,000 miles of plastic road in India, and roughly half are in the southern state of Tamil Nadu. Most are rural roads, but a small number have also been built in cities such as Chennai and Mumbai.


United Airlines is already purchasing jet fuel from Fulcrum Bioenergy's Reno Nevada facility which makes the jet fuel from municipal solid waste... ie, household trash. Fulcrum needs a feedstock composed of paper, cardboard, plastic, food, and yard waste. Their facility under construction in Gary, Indiana will take 700,000 tons of Chicago trash and convert it to 33 million gallons of jet fuel annually.


Though I support such innovative solutions they actually make no difference in the long term. The roads will eventually breakdown (whether it is 5 years or 20 years makes no difference) and spread the microplastics everywhere unless the roads can be recycled and laid down again as asphalt roads can be.

About 25% of the garbage by weight is being turned into jet fuel. Is this more efficient than just burning it for power? I didn't research it and don't know but it is still adding CO2 into the atmosphere.
"but if you make yourselves sheep, the wolves will eat you." Benjamin Franklin
March 7th, 2019 at 11:25:20 AM permalink
AZDuffman
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 128
Posts: 13286
Quote: kenarman


Though I support such innovative solutions they actually make no difference in the long term. The roads will eventually breakdown (whether it is 5 years or 20 years makes no difference) and spread the microplastics everywhere unless the roads can be recycled and laid down again as asphalt roads can be.


Roads are already one of the most recycled things. Either way we can figure that out in 5-20 years. New ideas will probably come by then. Everything eventually becomes a disposal issue.
The man who damns money has obtained it dishonorably; the man who respects it has earned it
March 7th, 2019 at 12:25:17 PM permalink
rxwine
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 144
Posts: 10256
Sun breaks down plastic. Probably should have roof dumps. Basically if you built buildings the right way, no one would see it.

Floating in the ocean sun breaks it up, but you still need to contain it. Plenty of space.
Trump says his supporters are dumber than a sack of rocks
March 7th, 2019 at 12:31:33 PM permalink
AZDuffman
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 128
Posts: 13286
Quote: rxwine
Sun breaks down plastic. Probably should have roof dumps. Basically if you built buildings the right way, no one would see it.

Floating in the ocean sun breaks it up, but you still need to contain it. Plenty of space.


Could make the roofing material out of it maybe?

Plastic is tough. Hard to recycle into consumer goods since so many different plastics. So you have to make it into something else. But recycling is not just making new pop bottles out of old. Often makes more sense to use it for something else. Like the grocery store used to have paper bags. Those got reused many ways, but never to carry groceries again.
The man who damns money has obtained it dishonorably; the man who respects it has earned it
March 7th, 2019 at 1:24:40 PM permalink
kenarman
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 11
Posts: 2190
Quote: rxwine
Sun breaks down plastic. Probably should have roof dumps. Basically if you built buildings the right way, no one would see it.

Floating in the ocean sun breaks it up, but you still need to contain it. Plenty of space.


It only breaks it down into microscopic pieces. The oceans of the world are now polluted with microplastics from pole to pole. The are totally into the food chain now. If you are eating seafood you are eating microplastics. Is this a serious health concern? We don't know yet but there is not much we can do since we have no way to remove them from the oceans.
"but if you make yourselves sheep, the wolves will eat you." Benjamin Franklin
March 7th, 2019 at 7:43:34 PM permalink
YeahBaby
Member since: May 24, 2016
Threads: 4
Posts: 321