More mansions

Page 14 of 15« First<1112131415>
April 6th, 2019 at 3:19:12 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 938
Posts: 11016
Quote: kenarman
LOL


50 Cent’s net worth is estimated to be $30 million, which is a huge drop from last year, when his net worth was declared at $150 million by Forbes. - Wealthy Gorilla
April 6th, 2019 at 3:24:37 PM permalink
Evenbob
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 134
Posts: 18981
Quote: Pacomartin
50 Cent’s net worth is estimated to be $30 million, which is a huge drop from last year, when his net worth was declared at $150 million by Forbes. - Wealthy Gorilla


What's wrong with a house that it's
in a money state, and sells for 84%
of what it sold for 12 years ago.

$3 mil is literally stealing it. It's
been for sale for 8-9 years and
nobody wanted it.
If you take a risk, you may lose. If you never take a risk, you will always lose.
April 6th, 2019 at 4:31:18 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 938
Posts: 11016
Quote: Evenbob
$3 mil is literally stealing it. It's been for sale for 8-9 years and nobody wanted it.


I don't know that it was ever worth a lot more. He only paid $4.1 million and it looks like he squandered money on redecorating

Boston.com
The mega-mansion was built in 1985 for Benjamin Sisti at the reported cost of $2.3 million.— at one point, it was five times bigger than Farmington’s second-largest home. To this day, it’s one of the largest homes in America.
In 1992, the mansion went into foreclosure and was sold to People’s Bank for $3.5 million in an auction.
The bank then sold it to Romas Martsinkiavitchous, a Lithuanian import-export business owner according to the Courant, for $2.7 million in 1993.
He managed to hold off creditors until 1996, when, facing foreclosure and back property taxes, he sold the house to boxer Mike Tyson for $2.8 million.
But just a year later, Tyson apparently hoped to do just that, putting the home up for sale for the ambitious price of $22 million — furnishings included. It did not find a buyer.
In 2003, the home was awarded to Tyson’s ex-wife, Monica Turner, as part of a divorce settlement. Tyson then declared bankruptcy. His $400 million fortune, The New York Times wrote, had been “squandered.’’
Months later, 50 Cent purchased the home from Turner for $4.1 million. He spent $6 million renovating the property.
50 Cent listed the house for sale at $18.5 million.
Over the years, the price would be cut and the home would be taken on and off the market. By the time Oprah Winfrey filmed a segment in the home in 2012, the asking price was $9,999,999.

Where I live Larry Holmes and the Andretti family built lavish homes for dozens of times the price of the surrounding neighborhood. They can't sell them for anywhere near what they cost to build

Larry Holmes built on 896 Sheridan Dr Easton, PA 18045 a 4 beds 6 baths 9,588 sqft 1981 home with an 8 car garage on 2.44 acres
Across the street at 901 Sheridan Dr Easton, PA 18045 2 beds 2 baths 1,016 sqft 1958 ranch sold for $120,000 on 05/10/17Year on 0.29 acres

Larry Holmes house has a private gym a steam room, a sauna and bar in the home. The home has an outdoor pool and an indoor pool which has been drained and covered with flooring and carpet to make indoor entertainment.

I don't know what Larry Holmes was thinking about by building such a lavish home in a relatively lower middle-class suburban neighborhood.
April 7th, 2019 at 6:14:01 AM permalink
SOOPOO
Member since: Feb 19, 2014
Threads: 9
Posts: 1008
Quote: Pacomartin


I don't know what Larry Holmes was thinking about by building such a lavish home in a relatively lower middle-class suburban neighborhood.


I remember Holmes always saying he wasn't going to leave his roots; that he felt part of his community. He didn't build it as an investment; he built it to live in.
April 7th, 2019 at 9:10:21 AM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 938
Posts: 11016
Quote: SOOPOO
I remember Holmes always saying he wasn't going to leave his roots; that he felt part of his community. He didn't build it as an investment; he built it to live in.

I can appreciate that. I was in the beautiful home of a Mexican craftsman who built in the small village where he grew up. The streets were dirt and a group of oxen pulling a cart was sharing the road with a handful of automobiles.

Larry Holmes built the home within three years of winning the heavyweight championship. About 5 years ago he put it on the market for $1.7 million (which is pretty cheap for a 10,000 sq foot home, but there were lots of people who went to the open-house, but no buyers.








There is a very nice neighborhood about a mile away from where Larry Holmes grew up with beautiful homes built in the 1880-1900 period. He didn't move in there, but I suppose he wanted a compound for his cars that he could never get in an 1880 home.


April 7th, 2019 at 9:43:49 AM permalink
Evenbob
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 134
Posts: 18981
I never understand how people can live in huge compounds
like that. Unless you have a big family, what's
the point. I only have 2000 square feet here and
it's way too big for me. I live in about 500 square
feet of it. I knew a guy 25 years ago who had a
Victorian mansion. 3 floors, every room was stuffed
with antiques, and he lived in the kitchen. He had
a big Lazy Boy recliner, that he watched TV in and
slept in, in the kitchen. The rest of his house was
like a museum that he visited once in awhile. It
was just too much work.
If you take a risk, you may lose. If you never take a risk, you will always lose.
April 7th, 2019 at 12:44:11 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 938
Posts: 11016
Quote: Evenbob
I never understand how people can live in huge compounds like that.


On July 17, 1980, Ali and Holmes signed to fight on October 2 at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. Promoter Don King said Ali would be paid $8 million and Holmes $6 million. Caesars Palace constructed a temporary 24,790-seat outdoor arena for the fight. The live gate was $6 million, a record for that time.

Right after that fight Larry Holmes began work on this house and finished it a year later. But the home is within 3.5 miles of the center city neighborhood that he grew up in (since 1954) and was a basically a middle class neighborhood (zoned for Medium Density Housing , not for Low Density Housing). So 30 some year later he couldn't sell it, even though he eventually dropped the price to $1.1 million.
August 21st, 2019 at 11:41:24 AM permalink
rxwine
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 140
Posts: 8148
Was for sale at 1 billion — sold for a mere 100,000.


Quote:
“This is the largest non-judicial foreclosure sale and the largest loss from a lender I’ve seen in 27 years,” Richards said. “My $150-million offer was legit, and now they have a catastrophic loss.”
In a luxury market that continues to break records, however, there’s likely massive interest for a one-of-a-kind property located at the highest point of the 90210. Celebrities, moguls, investors and even royals have been tussling over the mountaintop parcel for nearly half a century — and for good reason.
Views stretch from downtown Los Angeles to Catalina Island, and the closest neighbor is half a mile away. Disneyland, at roughly 85 acres, measures merely half the size of the property.
The grounds are divided into 17 parcels. Six of them, ranging from 2.5 acres to 12.2 acres, are zoned for residential development.
Despite many dreams of development, the hilltop kingdom has always remained dormant.
The mountaintop was once owned by a sister of the late shah of Iran, the Princess Shams Pahlavi, who had planned to build a lavish palace there. It didn’t happen.
It was later acquired by talk show host-turned-TV-producer Merv Griffin, who commissioned prominent designer Waldo Fernandez to create a marble-and-limestone mansion. It was never built.
After falling into financial trouble, Griffin sold the mountaintop for more than $8 million in 1997 to Mark Hughes, the founder of Herbalife, in a deal that reportedly set a price record at that time for Southern California.
After Hughes died in 2000 in his beachfront Malibu mansion at the age of 44, his estate sold the prized acreage to Dickens, who teamed with listing agent Aaron Kirman to try to sell the property last year.
Kirman told The Times he envisioned a single buyer, perhaps a royal family from the Middle East or a Chinese billionaire. Of the approximately 2,800 billionaires in the world, he said there are 100 that could and would want to buy the property.
If it sells for even $200 million, it’ll wallop the all-time price record for California. The current benchmark belongs to the Manor, which Formula One heiress Petra Ecclestone sold to a mystery buyer in July for $119.75 million.
Once dubbed Candyland for former owner Candy Spelling, widow of producer Aaron Spelling, the sprawling residence measures 56,500 square feet, or about 1,500 square feet larger than the White House, with 14 bedrooms and 27 bathrooms.
Views stretch from downtown Los Angeles to Catalina Island, and the closest neighbor is half a mile away. Disneyland, at roughly 85 acres, measures merely half the size of the property.
The grounds are divided into 17 parcels. Six of them, ranging from 2.5 acres to 12.2 acres, are zoned for residential development.
Despite many dreams of development, the hilltop kingdom has always remained dormant.[\q]
Trump Doctrine-Abandon loyal ally and make pathetic excuses why they weren't worthy
August 21st, 2019 at 12:53:11 PM permalink
Evenbob
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 134
Posts: 18981
Quote: rxwine
Was for sale at 1 billion — sold for a mere 100,000.


It's the undeveloped top of a mountain.

If you take a risk, you may lose. If you never take a risk, you will always lose.
August 21st, 2019 at 12:57:58 PM permalink
rxwine
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 140
Posts: 8148
Location, location, location.

I guess. 90210 zip code.
Trump Doctrine-Abandon loyal ally and make pathetic excuses why they weren't worthy
Page 14 of 15« First<1112131415>